In clay I bond with cathartic earth to heal and be healed, craving serenity and order in restiveness and chaos. My art is an attempt to capture stolen dreams and beauty lost, with imagination, with love. In the words of Amos Lee "Nothing is more powerful than beauty in wicked world."

Al-Melik Al-Qud’dous ‘The King The Most Sacred' Asma Allah al-Husna Earthstone 24K gold 12x49(d)cm 2008

Al-Melik Al-Qud’dous ‘The King The Most Sacred' Asma Allah al-Husna Earthstone 24K gold 12x49(d)cm 2008

Ainaki Ghabeta Nekheel II Earthstone amber glaze and 24K gold 29x40x10cm 2008 . Inspired by the famous poem أنشودة المطر (Rain Song) by the late Iraqi poet Bader Shaker al-Say'yab with inscriptions of the opening verses.  In this poem he combines his personal tragedy and the sociopolitical tragedy of his beloved homeland, Iraq.  His words are as relevant today as the day they were written.

Ainaki Ghabeta Nekheel II Earthstone amber glaze and 24K gold 29x40x10cm 2008 . Inspired by the famous poem أنشودة المطر (Rain Song) by the late Iraqi poet Bader Shaker al-Say'yab with inscriptions of the opening verses.  In this poem he combines his personal tragedy and the sociopolitical tragedy of his beloved homeland, Iraq.  His words are as relevant today as the day they were written.

Yalli imdhai' Wattan Earthstone and velvet glaze 45cm 2009 Harba Collection Italy

Yalli imdhai' Wattan Earthstone and velvet glaze 45cm 2009 Harba Collection Italy

Asma Allah al-Husna (2008) is a clay project in which Faraj specifically draws upon a method of Mesopotamian printmaking dating as early as 5000BC. This awareness of her cultural heritage grounds her practice in “the evolutionary thread of art in Iraq” to quote Lorna Selim; the personal, intimate nature of her sculpture creates an atmosphere of accessibility and openness, allowing new viewers with no previous knowledge of Iraqi history or art to join that same dialogue with ease.  And ultimately, this fusion of ancient and contemporary is well-suited to Faraj’s aspiration to contribute, through her art, to defining the identity of a culture and a people.

Asma Allah al-Husna (2008) is a clay project in which Faraj specifically draws upon a method of Mesopotamian printmaking dating as early as 5000BC. This awareness of her cultural heritage grounds her practice in “the evolutionary thread of art in Iraq” to quote Lorna Selim; the personal, intimate nature of her sculpture creates an atmosphere of accessibility and openness, allowing new viewers with no previous knowledge of Iraqi history or art to join that same dialogue with ease.  And ultimately, this fusion of ancient and contemporary is well-suited to Faraj’s aspiration to contribute, through her art, to defining the identity of a culture and a people.